InHenry Miller moved from New York to Paris, leaving behind — at least temporarily — his tempestuous marriage to June Smith and a novel that had sprung from his anguish over her love affair with a mysterious woman named Jean Kronski Begun in , Crazy Cock is the story of Tony Bring, a struggling writer whose bourgeois inclinations collide with the disordered bohemianism of his muchbeloved wife, Hildred, particularly when her lover, Vanya, comes to live with them in their already cramped Greenwich Village apartment In a world swirling with violence, sex, and passion, the three struggle with their desires, inching ever nearer to insanity, each unable to break away from this dangerous and consuming love triangle


10 thoughts on “Crazy Cock

  1. Christine Christine says:

    So nothing is ever going to compare with Tropic of Cancer. I'll just have to get over that. Henry Miller still writes better at his worst than, say, Dan Brown does at his best. The language of the book really shows that he had something to say but had yet to find the voice to express it in - like he was still trying to conform to what a novel should read like. I'm not going to scrap it because HM has enough charisma to make me read anything.
    Final verdict: it's okay as a slice of 1920s bohemia (New York that is) but you can tell Miller is dying to escape to France and begin his real writing career.


  2. Alex Alex says:

    I read Miller because I can...Hey Joe, guess what time it is...It's Miller Time. So douche out your cunts and trim up that puss bush. It's fucking Miller Time!


  3. Zac Zac says:

    Most of the other comments on this book seem pretty on point. Covers material that feature in his later works but in a sort of transitional style (The gold guard, rosewood neck of modern American literature...) Flashes of the later Miller brilliance are there, but the 3rd person narrative is laborious in comparison to the brilliantly serpentine 1st person used in the tropic books. The last 3 or 4 pages (post hemorrhoids :-) ) are purely epic, as wonderful, manic and perverse as anything he ever wrote.


  4. Elbereth Elbereth says:

    This book is awesome. I think the thing to enjoy about Henry Miller is that he's full of crap, but a fantastic writer. I enjoy his writings much more than Hemmingway (gag me) even if according to Signore Miller he's had sex with every woman he's laid eyes on.

    Not for the timid...but realize this is considered (along with Tropic of Cancer/Capricorn) to be a cornerstone of modern literature. His books were banned initially because of all the booty and obscene language.


  5. Mimi Wolske Mimi Wolske says:

    I forgot I didn't care all that much for Henry Miller's autobiographical novel that described his rage over his second wife's live-in lesbian lover.

    Why? Because Tony Bring, who is the author, calls himself in the book a writer bewildered by his independent wife, Hildred, and the sordid world of Greenwich Village in the 1920s, he depicts Tony as a sensitive soul in a rotten world but Tony is really a misogynistic bully.

    Tony's bourgeois upbringing and inclinations are shaken when Hildred (the morbid enchantress who was modeled after his unbalanced wife, June Mansfield Smith) announces that her dear friend Vanya (painter-poet Vanya (based on Jean Kronski), with an invented past as the bastard Romanoff princess, and men’s clothes), is coming to live with them.

    As Tony learns the truth—that Hildred and Vanya are indeed lovers—the tale descends into their sexual souls. Hildred comes across as a pseudo-bohemian and her lover, Vanya, cuts a pathetic figure.

    So, here the three of them are, in a world swirling with violence, sex, and passion, they struggle with their desires, and inching ever nearer to insanity, each unable to break away from the dangerous and consuming love triangle. This was the raw, human part of the novel that I loved...so very Miller.

    I found it excessively sentimental...mawkish. Then there was his anti-Semitic remarks, his overheated, hand-me-down surrealism, his purple prose, and his self-conscious decadence prefiguring the adolescent egomania you can find in so much of Miller's works later in his life.

    But, hey...this is only my opinion.


  6. jason jason says:

    It's no secret that Henry wrote this one early. Almost a first attempt at novel writing i hear. It is all subject and raw emotion, a portrait of love as well as a portrait of envy. Not the perfect novel, but a great look into the life of an artist in love with a woman who is in love with a woman.


  7. Evad Evad says:

    Henry Miller is a sad pathetic man. I want to slap the main character of this novel, who no doubt he based on himself and his own marital problems, but despite the deep annoyance I felt one thing remains immaculately clear: This man is a master of the human language. He has such an ability to describe that you have to surrender to his whiny, annoying, cuckolding characters.


  8. Christy Christy says:

    I was into Henry Miller novels for a while. This story is post break up to his wife June Smith, when Henry moves from New York to Paris. It is an account of his anguish over June's affair with another woman. The book is definitely Miller dealing with the break up and has been said to be his springboard in finding his writing style. The next book he wrote was Tropic of Cancer.


  9. Splashconception Splashconception says:

    this is one of henry miller's first works so he is still struggling with the surrealistic flourishes of language and delusions of linguistic granduer that characterizes his later work. This novel feels a little stale at times, or perhaps over dramatic. Interesting if you are a Henry Miller fan but certainly not one of his best works.


  10. Staci Staci says:

    Ah, Miller! It's all about his writing. It could be a tale of nothing, and I would still read it!!! (This book at times feels like that). I love his writing style and this early look at what was the predecessor to Tropic of Cancer is a treat.