If you think the alphabet stops with Z, you are wrong So wrong Leave it to Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell (with a little help from Dr Seuss) to create an entirely new alphabet beginning with Z! This rhyming picture book introduces twenty new letters and the creatures that one can spell with them Discover (and spell) such wonderfully Seussian creations as the Yuzz a ma Tuzz and the High Gargel orum Readers young and old will be giggling from beginning to end or should we say, from Yuzz to Hi!


10 thoughts on “On Beyond Zebra

  1. Archit Ojha Archit Ojha says:



    The verses go on knitting a web intertwined with another web of imaginations.

    The poem flows. A nice one with mellifluous words.

    There are letters beyond Z. Yes, there's a whole new world out there.

    Takes you to a land of an imaginary language with never before heard words that are figments of a child's imagination.


  2. Love of Hopeless Causes Love of Hopeless Causes says:

    In a multiverse of interpretations, here is another one. Opens with two mutants: Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell, a kid with a comb-over, and the narrator, some weirdo who has a fascination for buttocks. On panel one, Weirdo touches his buttocks while some mangy mutt that snuck into the classroom looks on. In panel two we learn that Conrad is a know-it-all while Weirdo leans in for a good look at the zebra's buttocks.


    (view spoiler)


  3. Mashaekh Hassan Mashaekh Hassan says:

    I'mma read all the books if Dr. Seuss! Getting ready for the marathon ahah


  4. Roma Roma says:

    General Raiting: 8/10
    Personal Raiting: 6.7/10


  5. Lisa Lisa says:

    back cover-If you think the alphabet stops with Z, you are wrong. So wrong. Leave it to Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell (with a little help from Dr. Seuss) to create an entirely new alphabet beginning with Z! This rhyming picture book introduces twenty new letters and the creatures that one can spell with them. Discover (and spell) such wonderfully Seussian creations as the Yuzz-a-ma-Tuzz and the High Gargel-orum. Readers young and old will be giggling from beginning to end . . . or should we say, from Yuzz to Hi!


  6. Robu-sensei Robu-sensei says:

    As a kid I loved weird words and other linguistic hijinx, and so it's no surprise that On Beyond Zebra was on the short list of favorite Seuss books. After rereading it just now, I realized that it was special in one other way: perhaps more than any other of the master's works, it spurred me to creativity (just like Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell in the story!). Looking back with my jaded, myopic grown-up eye, I can see that the new letters beyond Z are simple amalgamations of ordinary Roman letters, but at the time I was transfixed (and highly amused) by the bizarre shapes custom-made to name exotic animals. (What did Dr. Seuss have against plants, anyway? Are they too sessile and boring for kids?) Years later I was still making up new letters for words the brother and I had invented.

    An aside: To this day I cannot hear the word grotto without thinking of the Yekko singing away, down in his dim cave beneath branching Gothic arches.


  7. Kelly Kelly says:

    I believe I had this memorized by the time I was three. When my little brother was old enough, I got to recite it to him. I didn't need the pages for the words, just the pictures.


  8. Pooja Pooja says:

    Who wouldn't like to learn alphabets beyond Z?
    The book serves entertainment and happiness in a balanced amount.


  9. Nostalgia Reader Nostalgia Reader says:

    Still my most favorite Seuss book. I vividly remember checking it out from the school library in kindergarten and being amazed at how amazing it was--it's only taken me 20 years to finally purchase a copy for myself!

    Many of these critters remind me of lumberjack's fearsome and legendary creatures, especially the Wumbus, which is halfway to a slide-rock bolter, and that made me quite happy.

    I also personally relate to the Quandary, at least up to a point. Although, this is the ONE illustration that I feel like was different in the earlier version I read? No underwater scene with the kids, rather just a giant Quandary on the left page against black or blue, and the story on the right page. Maybe I'm confusing it with another story.

    REGARDLESS, this is the bestest Seuss for me.


  10. Grant E Moulton Grant E Moulton says:

    This book influenced my life more than any other book I read in my first reading years. It told me that I could color outside the lines. It told me that there existed a completely unknown world outside of my limited experience, and that I could discover that world and look forward to amazing adventures.

    Will this book offend some people? Yes, of course it will, as it makes children think for themselves and reconsider the limits that they assume are fixed and immobile. That may be a good thing and a bad thing. The book doesn't stand as the icon of perfection, but the ideas it presents made a huge difference in my young mind.

    In some ways this book reminds me of the forbidden fruit from the Garden of Eden, and has similar benefits and problems. The knowledge of things beyond our experience brings hard work, pain and disappointment, and maybe even death, just as that fruit did, but it also brings life, love, discovery and adventure.

    Or maybe the book is just a funny collection of strange drawings and verse that confuses young minds trying to memorize things and parrot them back to an instructor. What do you think?