really enjoyed this it was interesting seeing the things that jacqueline went through growing up and how she handled herself i m normally not a huge fan of novels being written in verse, but i felt it worked really well for this story will talkabout this one in an upcoming video youtube.com jessethereader really enjoyed this it was interesting seeing the things that jacqueline went through growing up and how she handled herself i m normally not a huge fan of novels being written in verse, but i felt it worked really well for this story will talkabout this one in an upcoming video youtube.com jessethereader Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend Jacqeuline Woodson recalls what life was like growing up in the 1960s and 1970s in this autobiographical middle grade novel Written in verse, her account portrays a life divided between the North and the South, learning about the civil rights movement, and discovering a burgeoning passion for writing stories I am born as the South explodes, too many people too many years enslaved, then emancipatedbut notClick here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend Jacqeuline Woodson recalls what life was like growing up in the 1960s and 1970s in this autobiographical middle grade novel Written in verse, her account portrays a life divided between the North and the South, learning about the civil rights movement, and discovering a burgeoning passion for writing stories I am born as the South explodes, too many people too many years enslaved, then emancipatedbut not free, the people who look like mekeep fightingand marchingand getting killedso that today February 12, 1963and every day from this moment on, brown children like me can grow up free Can grow up learning and voting and walking and ridingwherever wewant Woodson introduces young readers to important figures, such as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, and author James Baldwin Not even three years have passed since a brown girl named Ruby Bridgeswalked into an all white school Armed guards surrounded her while hundreds of white people spat and called her names She was six years old Whether she was living in Brooklyn, New York or spending the summer with her grandparents in South Carolina, Woodson never felt she fit in but, no matter where she was, family was her anchor Family was her shelter The ways in which she portrays the sense of love and security found in even the simplest aspects of being with family such as enjoying a warm meal are sublime Autumn is coming Outside, there s the sound of windthrough the pine trees But inside there are stories, there are biscuitsand grits and eggs, the fire in the potbellied stovealready filling the house with warmth She also paints a vivid portrayal of growing up at a time when race relations were strained to the point of breaking and learning to fight for one s rights and protect oneself in a violent society was as common as learning how to tie one s shoes This is the way brown people have to fight, my grandfather says You can t just put your fist up You have to insist on somethinggently Walk toward a thingslowly They learn how to change the South without violence, how not to be movedby the evil actions of others, how to walk slowly butwith deliberate steps How to sit at counters and be cursed atwithout cursing back, have food and drink pouredover them without standing up and hurting someone Even the teenagersget trained to sit tall, not cry, swallow back fear Brown Girl Dreaming is a cadent portrait of a little girl cherishing her family and dreaming of a better world We all have the same dream, my grandmother says To live equal in a country that s supposed to bethe land of the free She lets out a long breath, deep remembering I recently read Jacqueline Woodson s Another Brooklyn, and people here recommended that I read her middle grade kids book Brown Girl Dreaming Like Another Brooklyn, Brown Girl Dreaming is a poetic account of Woodson s upbringing in South Carolina and Brooklyn The entire book flows in dreamy poetry as Woodson describes growing up during the 1960s, and for that I rate it 4 lovely stars Jacqueline Woodson was born to Jack Woodson and Mary Ann Irby in 1963 in Columbus, Ohio Her father was determ I recently read Jacqueline Woodson s Another Brooklyn, and people here recommended that I read her middle grade kids book Brown Girl Dreaming Like Another Brooklyn, Brown Girl Dreaming is a poetic account of Woodson s upbringing in South Carolina and Brooklyn The entire book flows in dreamy poetry as Woodson describes growing up during the 1960s, and for that I rate it 4 lovely stars Jacqueline Woodson was born to Jack Woodson and Mary Ann Irby in 1963 in Columbus, Ohio Her father was determined that his children not live a life enmeshed in Jim Crow so he desired to live in the north Yet, Mary Ann pined for her Greenville, South Carolina home, and this soon become a source of friction The couple divorced, and the Irbys returned to South Carolina when Jacqueline was just a baby Mary Ann longed to join her siblings Kay and Robert in Brooklyn so for long stretches she left her children with her parents Gunnar and Georgia in Greenville Jacqueline writes of sipping hot chocolate on the porch, fireflies at dusk, and curling up with her siblings in her grandparents bed Despite the lingering de facto segregation, Greenville appears to be a wholesome place to raise a family Even when the Irbys arrived in Brooklyn to stay, Jacqueline and her older siblings spent the summers in Greenville as their mother worked a full time job Her writing reflects her dual homes Brooklyn and Greenville, and her loyalty to both places In Bushwick, Jacqueline describes what it was like to be a kid in the late 1960s At PS 106, she had teachers who saw the writer in her and encouraged her to share her gift with others She also meets her forever friend Maria who moved in next door, and the girls become as close as family, even though their cultures are vastly different Bushwick also appears to be a safe place to grow up The Black Panthers at the time were hinted at as being in California, the melting pot of cultures in Brooklyn appear here to thrive in concert with one another Jacqueline enjoys Maria s mother s arroz con frijoles yet also excels at double Dutch While describing the friction in the world at large, Woodson still writes in flowery poetry that remains dreamlike in prose It is oftentimes difficult for me to find quality middle grade books for my children I have read several books this year from recommendations from Goodreads friends It is a relief to know there are quality books for my kids that are also enjoyable for adults Jacqueline Woodson has been writing since childhood and has been published for over twenty years and won multiple awards for her work Brown Girl Dreaming won a National Book Award in 2014, and it is a book that I would easily allow my children to read An amazing poet and writer, I look forward to readingof Woodson s books I listened to this audiobook with my two daughters 1st grade and 5th grade and my grandmother on our most recent road trip This book is beautifully written and the imagery was spectacular It managed to captivate everyone in the car, which is saying something since there were 3 distinct generations represented.Jacqueline Wilson describes her childhood, growing up in the 1960 s In her youth, her time was divided amongst Ohio, South Carolina, and later, New York Each area provided a different I listened to this audiobook with my two daughters 1st grade and 5th grade and my grandmother on our most recent road trip This book is beautifully written and the imagery was spectacular It managed to captivate everyone in the car, which is saying something since there were 3 distinct generations represented.Jacqueline Wilson describes her childhood, growing up in the 1960 s In her youth, her time was divided amongst Ohio, South Carolina, and later, New York Each area provided a different experience and a vastly different culture This gave Ms Woodson the unique ability to describe her experiences, particularly those related to the civil rights movement, across a variety of social settings and geographic locales.As we were driving, I had to pause this story several times to answer questions and explain things to my daughters My oldest daughter, at ten years old, had a lot of questions This initiated some important discussions and proved to be quite enlightening for all parties.It never ceases to amaze me how children can spot right and wrong so clearly, before external forces try to taint their inner goodness Trying to explain the existence of Jim Crow laws and why Rosa Park s decision to sit at the front of the bus sparked such controversy at the time, led to some very interesting discussions Sometimes, adults can learn from children and should follow their lead The hatefulness and wrongness of those discriminatory and racist laws were incredibly obvious to my children The fact that this was ever allowed to go on was very difficult for their minds to grasp Overall, this was a very moving and thought provoking read It is the type of book that encourages insightful discussions and instills strong values at a young age It introduces young readers to some difficult, but important topics and raises awareness, lest we repeat history I would definitely recommend this book to others brown girl dreaming, tu es formidable TheI look at this poetic memoir, theI fall in love These short poems have imprinted themselves onto my heart They long to be remembered And they will be, because they are powerful and true and incomparable.brown girl dreaming, tu es inoubliable Jacqueline Woodson grew up in the North, with her mother, her father and her sister, and then she grew up in the South, with her mother, her sister, her brother and her grandparents, after her mother brown girl dreaming, tu es formidable TheI look at this poetic memoir, theI fall in love These short poems have imprinted themselves onto my heart They long to be remembered And they will be, because they are powerful and true and incomparable.brown girl dreaming, tu es inoubliable Jacqueline Woodson grew up in the North, with her mother, her father and her sister, and then she grew up in the South, with her mother, her sister, her brother and her grandparents, after her mother left her father Her grandpa became her new Daddy Later, she also grew up in the in between North and South, New York brown girl dreaming, tu es une illumination.Jackie wanted to read and write and dream and play, and the people around her wanted change and equality and marches Her family sat at the back when they took the bus they had to behave, they were oppressed, like all black people in and before the 60s Yes, things have changed since the 19th century slavery, for instance, was abolished but not nearly enough.brown girl dreaming, tu es une merveille By broaching such important topics, like segregation, equal treatment, movement, racism and oppression, this beautiful and moving memoir makes the reader think seriously about what it means to be human, what it means to be tolerated, accepted and loved It s important we don t forget about the past, because we have to do everything in our means not to repeat it.brown girl dreaming, tu es vraie Blog Youtube Twitter Instagram Google Bloglovin I ve never read anything quite like this before the telling of a life in such a unique way The writing is lovely , the way it is told memories in free style poetry I don t know what I can say to do justice to what Woodson has accomplished here Is it a memoir, a novel, a book of poetry No matter how it is categorized, it is clear that this is precisely what Woodson says about it in her author s note And that s what this book is my past, my people, my memories, my story This is perhaps I ve never read anything quite like this before the telling of a life in such a unique way The writing is lovely , the way it is told memories in free style poetry I don t know what I can say to do justice to what Woodson has accomplished here Is it a memoir, a novel, a book of poetry No matter how it is categorized, it is clear that this is precisely what Woodson says about it in her author s note And that s what this book is my past, my people, my memories, my story This is perhaps aimed at a YA audience as most of her books are but I didn t view it that way I think anyone of any age can appreciate this story of her family, the places she lived, the times in which she grew up, how her writing life developed and how she followed her dream I can t say enough about the beautiful writing She has provided us a tremendous sense of time and place growing up in the 1960 s and 1970 s in Greenville, SC and Brooklyn, NY and the inner thoughts of a young girl who dreams of becoming a writer Just before this I read a copy of Woodson s new book Another Brooklyn, to be published on 8 9 16 and I ll say the same thing here as I did in my review of it , she was born to write and I am grateful for profound experience it was for me to see her journey I m having the most difficult time writing a review for brown girl dreaming It s so hard to bubble over and breathe and cry and write, all at the same time Each and every page is a gift of wisdom and innocence and discovery Heartbreak Joy Family Loneliness Childhood History I savored and smiled as I read I wept I rushed out to buy my own copy I wish I could buy enough copies for the world My only reading goal for 2015 is to readpoetry Without design just luck of the queue at I m having the most difficult time writing a review for brown girl dreaming It s so hard to bubble over and breathe and cry and write, all at the same time Each and every page is a gift of wisdom and innocence and discovery Heartbreak Joy Family Loneliness Childhood History I savored and smiled as I read I wept I rushed out to buy my own copy I wish I could buy enough copies for the world My only reading goal for 2015 is to readpoetry Without design just luck of the queue at the library brown girl dreaming, a memoir in verse, was the first book I completed this year There is something sublime in that serendipity The book s opening poem signals the story Jacqueline Woodson seeks to tell I am born on a Tuesday at University HospitalColumbus, Ohio,USA A country caughtBetween Black and White.Woodson reminds us that when she was born in 1963, only seven years had passed since Rose Parks refused to give up her seat on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama The author, too, is of the South, but also of the Midwest and of the North She moved with her mother, sister and brother to Greenville, South Carolina to her mother s family when she was a toddler, and then to Brooklyn, New York in elementary school brown girl dreaming is also the story of a little girl finding her voice In Woodson s case, it was the discovery that words and stories belonged to her she just needed the time to meet them on her own terms I am not my sister Words from the books curl around each othermake little senseuntilI read them againand again, the storysettling into memory Too slow my teacher says Read FasterToo babyish, the teacher says Read older But I don t want to read faster or older orany way else that mightmake the story disappear too quickly from whereit s settlinginside my brain,slowly becoming a part of me A story I will remember long after I ve read it for the second, third, tenth, hundredth time.There is such joy and love in her verse, a profound appreciation for her family and for the places that make up her visions of home She writes of her mother s parents in South Carolina So the first time my mother goes to New York Citywe don t know to be sad, the weightof our grandparents love like a blanketwith us beneath it,safe and warm And of Brooklyn We take our food out to her stoop just as the grown upsstart dancing merengue, the women lifting their long dressesto show off their fast moving feet,the men clapping and yelling,Baila Baila until the living room floor disappears You may find brown girl dreaming on the fiction shelves of bookstores and libraries, for it is classified as a fictionalized memoir Leaving aside debates of genre, it is farlikely to find a readership from these fiction shelves, and that is a good and necessary thing Memoir and free verse may seem like odd companions, particularly in a book meant for younger readers, but oh, what a stellar opportunity to read and teach the power of poetry brown girl dreaming received the 2014 National Book Award for Young People s Literature and is ostensibly a book meant for middle grade readers, but it is timeless in its grace and eloquence I recommend it to everyone, regardless of age Were I a pre teen, I know I d be reading this at every available moment at the breakfast table, on the bus, in the cafeteria, in my room instead of suffering through long division homework and answering questions on the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of chapter 27 in my Social Studies text The intimacy and immediacy of brown girl dreaming feels like a secret passed between BFFs, a Technicolor now of an After School Special, the story of an American kid my age that is at once familiar in emotion and exotic in setting Were I the parent of a pre teen or a younger child, we would read this together, for this is the history of America in the 1960s, and it offers so many of those teachable moments opportunities to reach for history books, to seek out primary sources, to watch videos of speeches and documentaries of a time that is both distant, yet still very much at hand The same would hold true for a book club of adults brown girl dreaming can serve as a touchstone for African American literature and history, which is our shared history.As an adult, I read this with humility and wonder, enchanted by the voice of young Jacqueline Woodson as she discovers the importance of place, self, family, and words As a writer, I am awed and overjoyed by the beauty of her language, by the richness of her verse Even the silence has a story to tell you Just listen Listen Jacqueline Woodson, one of today s finest writers, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verseRaised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the s and s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child s soul as she searches for her place in the world Woodson s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become Told through vivid poems, Jacqueline Woodson shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s She covers everything from race to religion to the Civil Rights movement Woodson s life was very complicated and very rich in detail, which I really loved She s a natural storyteller that made me feel like I was transported back to each event through her writing And I will remember her story for a long time to come.As a result, I decided to share some of my favorite p Told through vivid poems, Jacqueline Woodson shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s She covers everything from race to religion to the Civil Rights movement Woodson s life was very complicated and very rich in detail, which I really loved She s a natural storyteller that made me feel like I was transported back to each event through her writing And I will remember her story for a long time to come.As a result, I decided to share some of my favorite passages that were featured in here, so that I can come back to this review and reminisce dayworkI m not ashamed, she says, cleaning is what I know I m not ashamed,if it feeds my children Don t any of you ever do daywork, she warns us I m doing it now so you don t have to the readerWhen we can t find my sister, we knowshe is under the kitchen table, a book in her hand,a glass of milk and a small bowl of peanuts beside her.We know we can call Odella s name out loud,slap the table hard with our hands,dance around it singing She ll Be Coming Round the Mountain so many times the song makes us sickand the circling makes us dizzyand stillmy sister will do nothing than slowly turn the page south carolina at warThis is the way brown people have to fight,my grandfather says You can t just put your fist up You have to insiston somethinggently Walk toward a thingslowly.But be ready to die,my grandfather says, for what is right.Be ready to die, my grandfather says, for everything you believe in More than a hundred years, my grandfather says, and we re still fighting for the free lifewe re supposed to be living the stories cora tellsDon t believe everything you hear, Jackie.Someday, you ll come to knowwhen someone is telling the truthand when they re just making up stories composition notebookNothing in the world is like this a bright white page withpale blue lines The smell of a newly sharpened pencilthe soft hush of itmoving finallyone dayinto letters writing 1It s easier to make up storiesthan it is to write them down When I speak,the words come pouring out of me The storywakes up and walks all over the room Sits in a chair,crosses one leg over the other, says,Let me introduce myself Then just starts going on and on.But as I bend over my composition notebook,only my namecomes quickly Each letter, neatly printedbetween the pale blue lines Then whitespace and air and me wondering, How do Ispell introduce Trying again and againuntil there is nothing but pinkbits of eraser and a hole nowwhere a story should be the other woodsonEven though so many people think my sister and Iare twins,I am the other Woodson, following behind her each yearinto the same classroom she had the year before Eachteacher smiles when they call my name Woodson, theysay You must be Odella s sister Then they nodslowly, over and over again, call me Odella Say,I m sorry You look so much like her and she is SO brilliant then wait for my brilliance to light upthe classroom Wait for my arm to fly intothe air with every answer Wait for my pencilto move quickly through the too easy math problemson the mimeographed sheet Wait for me to standbefore class, easily reading words even high schoolstudents stumble over And they keep waiting.And waitingand waitingand waitinguntil one day, they walk into the classroom,almost call me Odel then stopremember that I am the other Woodsonand begin searching for brillianceat another desk readingI am not my sister.Words from the books curl around each othermake little senseuntilI read them againand again, the storysettling into memory Too slowthe teacher says.Read faster.Too babyish, the teacher says.Read older.But I don t want to read faster or older orany way else that mightmake the story disappear too quickly from where it s settlinginside my brain,slowly becominga part of me.A story I will rememberlong after I ve read it for the second, third,tenth, hundredth time That last sentence is so beautiful stevie and meEvery Monday, my mother takes usto the library around the corner We are allowedto take out seven books each On those days,no one complainsthat all I want are picture books.Those days, no one tells me to read fasterto read harder booksto read like Dell.No one is there to say, Not that book,when I stop in front of the small paperbackwith a brown boy on the cover.Stevie.I read One day my momma told me, You know you re gonna havea little friend come stay with you And I said, Who is it If someone had been fussing with meto read like my sister, I might have missedthe picture book filled with brown people, brown people than I d ever seenin a book before.The little boy s name was Steven buthis mother kept calling him Stevie.My name is Robert but my momma don tcall me Robertie.If someone had takenthat book out of my handsaid, You re too old for thismaybeI d never have believedthat someone who looked like mecould be in the pages of the bookthat someone who looked like mehad a story REPRESENTATION MATTERS how to listen 7Even the silencehas a story to tell you.Just listen ListenTo say Brown Girl Dreaming hit home would be an understatement This book came at the exact right moment for me to read And the way Woodson told her story and that of her family felt like I was right there.To quote the authorAs my sister reads, the pictures begin formingas though someone has turned on a television,lowered the sound,pulled it up close.Grainy black and white pictures come slowly at meDeep Infinite Remembered Speaking of, the writing in here was gorgeously elucidated I m cravingof Jacqueline Woodson s words, so I m hoping to pick up The Other Side in the near future.Oh, and I also really appreciated that the author took the time to include some great family photosNote I m anAffiliate If you re interested in buying Brown Girl Dreaming, just click on the image below to go through my link I ll make a small commissionThis review andcan be found on my blog Brown Girl DreamingJacqueline Woodson The author won the National Book Award in 2014 in the category of Young People s Literature for Brown Girl Dreaming We tend to believe that the way our memory process works is similar to a movie playing back in our heads in a sort of linear, chronological order, in reality though, at least in my experience, memories come in flashes and moments, not in long scenes like in a book or a documentary According to some literary critics, the use of poems as a Brown Girl DreamingJacqueline Woodson The author won the National Book Award in 2014 in the category of Young People s Literature for Brown Girl Dreaming We tend to believe that the way our memory process works is similar to a movie playing back in our heads in a sort of linear, chronological order, in reality though, at least in my experience, memories come in flashes and moments, not in long scenes like in a book or a documentary According to some literary critics, the use of poems as a format to write memoirs was pretty much unheard of before Woodson did it And I have to say that it does work beautifully on the lyrical and mesmerizing Brown Girl DreamingMemory doesn t come as a straight narrative, Woodson said about why she didn t choose prose It comes in small moments with all this white spaceWith its innovative and creative use of succinct, vivid poems and vignettes Brown Girl Dreaming is a unique memoir that explores the power of dreams and words and how writing can help you make sense of the world you live in and in the process find your life s purpose.On an interview with NPR, Woodson describes that the first time she discovered poetry and loved it was in elementary school when reading Langston HughesUntil then, I thought it was some code that older white people used to speak to each other I didn t know what was going on with the line breaks and the words, Woodson recalls Once the floodgates opened, they openedThe world Woodson was born into, was turbulent and chaotic, and she skillfully brings the reader along to experience how it was to grow up in America as a black girl during the 1960 s and 1970 s Growing up during the last throes of the Jim Crow era and right in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement, Woodson weaves these poems to narrate both her family and personal stories as well as the political upheaval of the times.In the background little Jacqueline can hear the grown ups discussing civil rights marches, non violence resistance training, MLK and Malcolm X, Freedom Singers and a girl named Ruby Bridges Seeing these political events through the eyes of a child provides a wonderful and different perspective Brown Girl Dreaming starts on February 12, 1963 in Columbus, Ohio, the day Woodson was born in a country caught between Black and White as she describes it.The poem A Girl name Jack is about her parents arguing to choose her name is amusing A Girl Name JackGood enough name for me, my father saidthe day I was born.Don t see whyshe can t have it, too.But the women said no.My mother first.Then each aunt, pulling my pink blanket backpatting the crop of thick curls,tugging at my new toes,touching my cheeks.We won t have a girl named Jack, my mother said.As you can tell by the author s given name, you know who won that argument The Problem We All Live With by Norman Rockwell depicts Ruby Bridges as a 6 year old on her way to school during the process of racial desegregation in the South Her parent s differences didn t end with their little squabble about choosing Jacqueline s name They were also divided by Jacqueline s mom yearning to go back to her native South Carolina and her dad s disdain of the South Here s a poem that describes their differences JourneyYou can keep your South, my father says.The way they treated us down there,I got your mama out as quick as I could.Brought her right up here to Ohio.Told here there s never gonna be a Woodsonthat sits in the back of the bus.Never gonna be a Woodson that has to Yes sir and No sir white people.Never gonna be a Woodson made to look down at the ground.All your kids are stronger than that, my father says.All you Woodson kids deserve to beas good as you already are.Yes sirree, Bob, my father says.You can keep your South Carolina.This poem provides a window into how Woodson love for writing began The BeginningI cannot write a word yet but at three,I now know that letter Jlove the way it curves into a hookthat I carefully top with a straight hatthe way my sister has taught me to do Love the sound of the letter and the promisethat one day this will be connected to a full name,my own.That I will be able to writeby myself.Without my sister s hand over mine,making it do what I cannot yet do.How amazing these words are that slowly come to me.How wonderfully on and on they go.Will the words end, I askwhenever I remember to.Nope, my sister says, all of five years old now,and promising meinfinity.I read this book as I listened along to Woodson s own narration of the audiobook version The rhythm of the short poems makes for a great read aloud and who better to perform her own words than the writer herself This book is both personal and political, is about family, friendship, religion, race and prejudice but at its core, is about the author s love of writing and how she discovered her passion for it.That Woodson so eloquently crafted these linked poems to create a narrative that flows so naturally, is a testament to her talents as a writer and to the power and beauty of the written word.So Jacqueline with a J a Q, I salute you for writing such a wonderful book