Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to , He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions He cannot stand to be touched And he detests the color yellowAlthough gifted with a superbly logical brain, for fifteen year old Christopher everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning He lives on patterns, rules, and a diagram kept in his pocket Then one day, a neighbor s dog, Wellington, is killed and his carefully constructive universe is threatened Christopher sets out to solve the murder in the style of his favourite logical detective, Sherlock Holmes What follows makes for a novel that is funny, poignant and fascinating in its portrayal of a person whose curse and blessing are a mind that perceives the world entirely literally I m not sure what I was expecting but it wasn t this book I couldn t decide to give 3 or 4 stars so I m going with 3 because I liked it and 3 is my mid point I loved the lay out of the book and the little pictures I must admit the maths went right over my head I love that Christopher went on a hunt for the evil killer I wanted that killer to be forked too Overall, it s a good quick read I finished before bed last night Happy Reading Mel The Prime Reasons Why I Enjoyed Mark Haddon s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night time 2 Death broken down into its molecular importance.3 Clouds, with chimneys and aerials impressed upon them, and their potential as alien space crafts.5 Black Days and Yellow cars.7 Red food coloring for Indian cuisine.11 Christopher s reasons for loving The Hound of the Baskervilles and disdaining Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.13 White lies.17 The patience of Siobhan19 Father s frustration, and Father The Prime Reasons Why I Enjoyed Mark Haddon s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night time 2 Death broken down into its molecular importance.3 Clouds, with chimneys and aerials impressed upon them, and their potential as alien space crafts.5 Black Days and Yellow cars.7 Red food coloring for Indian cuisine.11 Christopher s reasons for loving The Hound of the Baskervilles and disdaining Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.13 White lies.17 The patience of Siobhan19 Father s frustration, and Father s love 23 I reasoned that 29 Metaphors are lies and similes are not.31 The intimacy of fanning out the fingers and pressing the hand of another 37 Christopher punches a policeman and later decides he doesn t like policeman much after all.41 My empathy for Father s pain.43 Mystification through demystification.47 Father admitting one of his crimes before he was caught.53 Did I mention Christopher 59 A Level Maths.61 The London Underground as a scary, thrilling adventure.67 Toby the rat.71 Wellington forked.73 The book has yet to be discovered by Oprah.79 Behavioral Problems83 Maps89 Prime numbers Prime chapters97 That every day life, if seen from a certain perspective, can provide the conflict for a compelling novel This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This book I read in a day I was in a Chapters bookstore in Toronto that s like Barnes and Noble to the Americans in the crowd and anyway I was just browsing around, trying to kill time When suddenly I saw this nice display of red books with an upturned dog on the cover Attracted as always to bright colours and odd shapes, I picked it up It s only about 250 pages or so I read the back cover and was intrigued I flipped through the pages and noticed that it had over One Million chapters I This book I read in a day I was in a Chapters bookstore in Toronto that s like Barnes and Noble to the Americans in the crowd and anyway I was just browsing around, trying to kill time When suddenly I saw this nice display of red books with an upturned dog on the cover Attracted as always to bright colours and odd shapes, I picked it up It s only about 250 pages or so I read the back cover and was intrigued I flipped through the pages and noticed that it had over One Million chapters I was doubly intrigued So I walked over to the far wall of the bookstore to sit and begin to read a few pages I always do this to ensure that I don t waste what little money I have on a book possessing nothingthan a flashy cover I do the same at the cinema if I don t like the first 20 minutes, I get a refund Restaurants, too if I don t like the first ten bites, I walk out on the bill This is a book written by a Child Developmental Psychologist I think that s the right term anyway, a doctor who works with mentally or physically challenged youngsters The novel itself is a first person tale written by a high functioning, mentally challenged boy in England who wakes up one morning to find his neighbor s dog dead on his lawn The boy s teacher suggests he should write about the incident, which he eagerly sets out to do So we have his first novel , The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time He plays Inspector and tries to solve the mystery as Sherlock Holmes would doOf course, if he s going to write a book, that means he can take control He hates the way other books have chapter numbers that increase sequentially 1,2,3 He prefers prime numbers and will number his chapters in sequential primes hence, by the end of the book, you re reading chapter 123,314,124 or whatever I ain t no math guy Now then, he also writes about other things in his life and through his perspective you get some tear jerking moments of true, unobstructed humanity the way his parents broke up because of his state, how he has all these dreams about being someone great and going to a top college, even though you know that his situation will never really allow it Anyway I read this book cover to cover sitting on the floor of that Chapters bookstore By the end of it I was absolutely bawling my eyes out Never cried so much in my life In fact, as I type this and think back on that story, I m dripping on my keyboard and I m at my office However these are tears of joy The boy does it He can do anything It s the most uplifting book I ve ever read.I highly recommend this book to anyone who feels anything deep down inside Coping With ConscienceMy 34 year old daughter is severely autistic, and has been since she was seven No one knows why and the condition has never varied in its intensity So she is stuck in time She knows this and vaguely resents it somewhat but gets on with things as best she can.Each case of autism is probably unique My daughter has no facility with numbers or memory but she does with space As far as I can tell any enclosed space appears to her as a kind of filing system which she can deci Coping With ConscienceMy 34 year old daughter is severely autistic, and has been since she was seven No one knows why and the condition has never varied in its intensity So she is stuck in time She knows this and vaguely resents it somewhat but gets on with things as best she can.Each case of autism is probably unique My daughter has no facility with numbers or memory but she does with space As far as I can tell any enclosed space appears to her as a kind of filing system which she can decipher almost instantly When she was twelve I brought her into a cavernous Virgin megastore to get a particular CD She had never been in the place before, but after standing in the doorway for three or four seconds, she walked immediately to the correct aisle and bin and picked out the desired CD without any hesitation.I have a theory, probably rubbish, that autistic people perceive the world as it actually is or,precisely, within strictly limited categories that might be called natural , somewhat in the vein of Kantian transcendentals space, time, numbers, etc Most, like my daughter and Christopher, the protagonist of The Curious Incident, have no facility with purely linguistic manipulation metaphor, lying, irony, jokes, complex allusion, actually fiction of any sort The world is not just literal, it exists in a way that ensures words are always subservient to things and without imagination that it could be any other way In my experience autistic people tend to become upset when non autistic people attempt to reverse the priority by making things subservient to words This makes the autistic person confused, anxious, and often angry They appear resentful that such liberties can be taken with what is so obviously reality In effect, the autistic life is devoted to truth as what is actually there , stripped of all emotional, figurative, and cultural content This makes autistic people often difficult to live with They insist and they persist about things which appear trivial to others They nag and needle until they obtain recognition In those areas that interest them, they are capable of splitting the finest hairs to avoid abandoning their perceptions of the world They may on occasion conform in order to gain a point but they never really give in They are stalwart in being, simply, themselves Adaptation occurs elsewhere, not in them.It is, therefore, probably impossible for non autistic people to live without tension among autistic people The latter are maddening in the solidity of their selves They are, in a sense, elemental, for all we know formed in the intense energy of a star in some distant galaxy Fortunately, the fact that most of us cannot understand their elemental force is not something that worries them very much Their emotional reactions may be intense but these attenuate rapidly, leaving little damaging residue Ultimately, perhaps, autistic people are the conscience of the world And conscience is always troublesome, not because it threatens to judge but because it reveals